Startup-NY: NY Creates Tax Free Zones to Attract and Grow Businesses Across the State

New York State has one of the highest tax levels. The high New York taxes discourage business investments in this state.dreamstime_xs_5043913 (1)

New York has thrown out the welcome mat to start-up businesses in a new program beginning January 1, 2014. Under the program, Startup-NY has created tax free zones to attract and grow new businesses. Startups that are creating new jobs are the beneficiaries of this program. The goal of the program is to attract venture capital, new businesses and investments from around the world.

Startup-NY provides major incentives for businesses to relocate, start up or significantly expand in New York State. It requires formal affiliation with public and private universities, colleges and community colleges. Businesses will have the opportunity to operate state and local tax-free on or near academic campuses, and their employees will pay no state or local personal income taxes. In addition, businesses may qualify for additional incentives.

We can help. The rules are new and appear to be complicated. We have prepared a 10-page guide to help you understand the benefits and how to qualify. Please click on the following link in order to obtain the guide.

Download our free guide:Startup-NY: New Tax Free ZonesTo Attract  Businesses




Practical Year-end Tax Cutting Suggestions for Individuals

It’s not too late to consider tax moves that could reduce your 2013 taxes and get you in a better tax position for 2014. Here are some ideas:taxform 1040-resized-180

  • Be aware of higher tax rates. In 2013 the top tax rate has been increased to 39.6% for top bracket taxpayers (with taxable income over $400,000 for singles, $450,000 for married taxpayers). In addition, singles with income greater than $200,000 (or $250,000 for married taxpayers) will be subject to the new 3.8% surtax on net investment income. If you believe that you will be close to this limitation, consider making moves that will defer income into 2014.
  • Take advantage of tax-deferred accounts. All of the new tax rates and phase-outs are based upon adjusted gross income or taxable income. The most efficient way to reduce both of those items is to maximize contributions to tax-deferred retirement plans. If your employer offers such a plan, make maximum use of it (such as a deferred compensation plan). If not, see if you are eligible for your own deductible IRA. 
  • Consider a health savings account (HSA). Investing in an HSA gives you a current-year tax deduction, while providing a savings account to use to pay out-of-pocket medical expenses currently or in the future. An HSA is not a “use it or lose it” plan. Any funds in the plan can be used in future years. And be aware that you can fully fund your HSA up to April 15th of the following year.
  • Make charitable gifts from your IRA. Seniors age 70½ and older can make charitable contributions directly from their IRA. While this won’t be deductible, it can apply against your annual required minimum distribution (RMD), thereby lowering your adjusted gross income.

For guidance with your year-end tax planning, contact our office

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: To ensure compliance with Treasury Department regulations, we inform you that any U.S. federal tax advice contained is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein.